Percentage of WIC recipients, age 3-23 months, who have high weight-for-length

Percentage of WIC recipients, age 3-23 months, who have high weight-for-length

While obesity is not typically measured among very young children, it is important to monitor infant and child growth over time and identify any abnormalities in the child’s development that may arise.
The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends using the weight-for-length growth standards to assess the nutritional status of children younger than two. These standards have been recognized internationally in efforts to prevent child malnutrition and obesity.
The estimates are from 2018. High weight-for-length is defined as ≥2 standard deviations above the sex- and age-specific median in the World Health Organization (WHO) growth standards. Weight is measured to the nearest one-quarter pound, and length to the nearest one-eighth inch, using an infant measuring board according to CDC surveillance standards. Children with missing values of sex, weight, or length, or who had a length outside the range in the WHO growth standards (45–110 cm) were excluded. In addition, children with biologically implausible values were excluded from analyses. State estimates do not include data from WIC agencies in Indian Tribal Organizations (ITOs).
This indicator can be disaggregated by race/ethnicity. The included subgroups are American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian/Pacific Islander, non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic White.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity. (2015). Growth Chart Training: Using WHO Growth Charts. https://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/growthcharts/who/using/assessing_growth.htm Daniels, S. R., & Hassink, S. G. (2015). The role of the pediatrician in primary prevention of obesity. Pediatrics, 136(1), e275-e292. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2015-1558 De Onis, M., & Onyango, A. W. (2008). WHO child growth standards. Lancet, 371(9608), 204-204. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(08)60131-2

Source:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity. (2021). Data, trends and maps. https://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/data-trends-maps/index.html

Not Ranked
This indicator does not factor into the category's GROW ranking.